Course Descriptions


ACCOUNTING
Prerequisites: .
A study of the biblical plan for the support of the church. The course includes general bookkeeping of church finance, proper use of tithes and offerings, principles of stewardship, preparation of the church budget, and the principles of conducting the business affairs of the church.
This course introduces students to the basic concepts and techniques of accounting. It deals with different aspects of measuring, classifying, summarizing, reporting, and interpreting financial information within the context of generally accepted accounting principles. Topics include the accounting cycle, merchandising activities, cash, receivables, bank reconciliation, payables, and inventories.
Prerequisites: ACCT221.
Topics include liabilities, stockholders' equity, bonds, stocks, professional judgment and ethical conduct, statement of cash flow, manual special journals, plant and equipment, natural resources, and intangibles. Cost and managerial concepts are examined.
Prerequisites: ACCT222.
The course focuses on a review of the accounting process, statement of income and retained earnings, balance sheet and statement of cash flow, cash and receivables, revenue recognition, valuation of inventories, acquisition and disposition of property, plant and equipment, depreciation, and depletion.
Prerequisites: ACCT321.
Intangible assets, current liabilities and contingencies, long-term liabilities, stockholders' equity, temporary and long-term investments, accounting changes, error analysis, and financial accounting disclosure.
Prerequisites: ACCT222.
A study of cost determination, accumulation, and allocation procedures.Preparation and utilization of financial information for internal management purposes; emphasis on job order, process and standard costs systems, costvolume profit relationship, relevant cost, budgeting, performance evaluation, and control.
Prerequisites: ACCT321.
A selection of topics encountered by accountants in international business settings. Topics include accounting systems in a global environment, international financial reporting and analysis, foreign currency, budgeting, and management accounting control.
Special Approval: Permission of the faculty member required Intensive study of selected topics of current interest in the sub-discipline area noted and not ordinarily covered in depth in other courses.
Prerequisites: ACCT222.
The application of international and Lebanese tax laws to individuals and enterprises, with emphasis on partnerships, estates, and enterprises. It includes capital transactions, pension and profit sharing plans, estate and gift taxes, and tax audits and refunds.
Prerequisites: .
Corequisite: ACCT322 The study of the fundamental accounting systems used by government, hospitals, colleges and universities, and other not-for- profit organizations. Topics include the budgeting process, and the analysis and interpretation of governmental and not-for-profit financial statements.
Prerequisites: .
Corequisite: ACCT322 Advanced financial accounting theory emphasizing problems related to specialized accounting entities. Topics include partnerships, joint ventures, installment sales, consignments, accounting for branches, business combinations, and consolidated financial statements.
Prerequisites: .
Corequisite: ACCT322 Internal and external auditing; current professional standards, ethics of the auditor with emphasis on internal control, and evidence gathering.
Prerequisites: .
A program of accounting experience. Student must be a Junior and have at least a B- cumulative GPA. A total of 225 hours of work experience is required. Full arrangements for a structured program must be made in advance.
Special Approval: Permission of the faculty member required Topics of current interest in the sub-discipline area noted not ordinarily covered in depth in other courses.
Topics of current interest in the business area not ordinarily covered in-depth in regular courses.
The use of accounting data in decision making. Special attention is given to cost analysis and control, cost allocation, budgeting, and motivational aspects of accounting. Analysis of data from original records is studied.

ARABIC LANGUAGE
A course in grammar, writing, reading, and some basic conversation providing an overview of and an introduction to the structure of the Modern Standard Arabic.
An introductory course in grammar, providing an overview of and an introduction to the structure of the Arabic language, with emphasis on sentence patterns, basic sentence constituents, parts of speech and tenses.
An introductory course in speaking and listening, providing an overview of and introduction to the functions of spoken Modern Standard Arabic.
An introductory course in writing, beginning with the instruction of Arabic characters, the formation of words and simple sentences.
An introductory course in reading, providing an overview of how to recognize Arabic characters and words and simple texts.
An introductory course in understanding spiritual life in an Arabic context, providing personal interaction with the Arabic language Bible in terms of words, themes, phrases, nuances and implications.
Development of Arabic grammatical, writing, reading, and some basic conversation skills necessary for clear written and oral communication in Modern Standard Arabic.
Development of Arabic grammatical, writing, reading, and some basic conversation skills necessary for clear written and oral communication in Modern Standard Arabic.
Development of fluency in conversation and accuracy in listening skills necessary for effective communication in academic and non-academic settings.
Development of writing skills to form more complex sentences and paragraphs. Development of writing strategies and skills necessary for welldeveloped academic writing
Development and emphasis on building vocabulary and reading skills. Introduction of simple texts from authentic Arabic books and newspapers.
Prerequisites: ALNG150.
The introduction of simple texts (and their memorization) from the Arabic language Bible together with the development and emphasis on building biblical Arabic language vocabulary towards deeper understanding of spiritual life in an Arabic language context.
This course will give a periodic review of news coverage and current events in the Arab world, including the Gulf, Levantine and North Africa. It will focus on review of television, newspapers, magazines and radio programs.
Lectures, readings and discussions will introduce students to the diversity of cultures within the Levantine, North Africa and the Gulf region. It will give an overview of history, arts and politics.
In-depth review of Arabic grammar. Emphasis on accurate grammar usage in a variety of communicative and academic contexts both oral and written.
Further development of fluency in conversational Arabic. Introduction of authentic listening situations for mastery. Development of accuracy in listening and speaking Modern Standard Arabic.
Development of skills in writing with an emphasis on the formation of more complex sentence structures, paragraphs, and essays.
Development of skills in analytical reading and discussion of academic and non- academic topics.
Prerequisites: ALNG250.
The development of skills in analytical reading and discussion of spiritual themes in the Arabic language Bible together with implications for spiritual influence and exchange in an Arabic language context.
One credit repeatable for a total of three (3) credits for the whole academic year. 110 hours of activity are required for one semester internship credit. Internship's credit is included in the full-load taken by the student. Opportunities: communication, marketing, teaching, television, international development, IT, business, graphic design, photography, and chaplaincy.
A prerequisite for the MA in Islamic Studies program for students who do not have a proficiency in Arabic language skills. The development of Arabic grammar, vocabulary, and reading skills together with an introduction of simple texts from the Arabic language Bible, the Qur'an and other Arabic literature.
A prerequisite for the MA in Islamic Studies program for students who do not have a proficiency in Arabic language skills. The development of Arabic grammar, vocabulary, and reading skills together with an introduction of simple texts from the Arabic language Bible, the Qur'an and other Arabic literature.

ARABIC LANGUAGE
A study of the essay, its development, and its various types. A collection of readings illustrating the types, with literary analysis and written application. Exercises in speech, discussion, and interpretive reading. For Freshman level only.
An introduction to the role of language in communication. The course includes a study of texts (scientific and literary), general principles of the Arabic language, and skills of written expression. Students are required to apply what they have learned by writing a research paper and presenting it in the class.

BIOLOGY
A broad survey of living systems at the molecular, cellular and organismal levels. Ecological principals are covered along with a survey of microbes, plants and animals. BIOL112 includes a 3-hour laboratory session.
A broad survey of living systems at the molecular, cellular and organismal levels. Ecological principals are covered along with a survey of microbes, plants and animals. BIOL112 includes a 3-hour laboratory session.
Prerequisites: .
Corequisite: BIOL111 A 3-hour laboratory session on topics covered in BIOL111.
This is a first-year foundational biology course. The areas covered include: biological chemistry, cell biology, enzyme function, metabolism, DNA replication and repair, photosynthesis, genetics, genetic technology, and bioinformatics. All of these topics are covered in the context of a literal six-day creation. Throughout the course, issues of evolution and creation will be presented and discussed. NO LAB
This is a first-year foundational biology course. The areas covered include: biological chemistry, cell biology, enzyme function, metabolism, DNA replication and repair, photosynthesis, genetics, genetic technology, and bioinformatics. All of these topics are covered in the context of a literal six-day creation. Throughout the course, issues of evolution and creation will be presented and discussed. The class includes a 3-hour laboratory session.
Lab for General Biology 201
Lab for General Biology 202
This course builds on first semester cellular and molecular basis of biology. Topics covered in a creation context include: taxonomy, prokaryote biology, fungi, non-vascular and vascular plants, gymnosperms, angiosperms, plant form and function, nutrition, transport and reproduction, invertebrates, vertebrates, comparative anatomy and homeostasis, neuroscience, muscles and skeletal systems, nutrition, digestion, respiration and circulation. Major ecological concepts are covered including biomes and ecosystems, population ecology, species interactions, community ecology, biodiversity and conservation. The class includes a 3-hour laboratory session.
This course builds on first semester cellular and molecular basis of biology. Topics covered in a creation context include: taxonomy, prokaryote biology, fungi, non-vascular and vascular plants, gymnosperms, angiosperms, plant form and function, nutrition, transport and reproduction, invertebrates, vertebrates, comparative anatomy and homeostasis, neuroscience, muscles and skeletal systems, nutrition, digestion, respiration and circulation. Major ecological concepts are covered including biomes and ecosystems, population ecology, species interactions, community ecology, biodiversity and conservation. NO LAB
This is a foundational course aimed at providing clinical time where students will learn basic health assessment techniques along with experience in providing health education in relation to human health and physiology in a community-based environment. Some classroom instruction followed by clinical time working in a community environment.
The first semester of a two semester course sequence covering structure and function of the human body and mechanisms for maintaining homeostasis. Topics covered include cells, tissues, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems.
Prerequisites: BIOL221.
A continuation of the structure and function of the human body and homeostasis. Systems covered include neurological (with sensory systems), endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Growth, development, metabolism, fluid and electrolyte balance, acid-base balance, and genetics are also covered.
Prerequisites: BIOL211.
These courses build on what was learned in BIOL 211. They are essentially clinical courses with some classroom learning, then using what is learned to apply in a community health education environment. Both are taken sequentially over two different semesters. Topics to be covered may include: health expo techniques, wellness and healthy living, depression recovery, diabetes education, issues of addiction including smoking, alcohol and drug education. Students will also gain experience in providing instruction to more junior students.
Prerequisites: BIOL201.
The study of inheritance and the molecular mechanisms which impact it with an emphasis on problem-solving. Emphasis is also placed on learning scientific writing skills.
Prerequisites: BIOL201,BIOL20.
Prerequisites: BIOL201,BIOL20.
This course covers the history of microbiology, pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria, fungi of medical significance and the gram method of staining. Viruses are reviewed along with HIV and bacteriophages. The course includes an introduction to parasitology including protozoa (with a focus on malaria and other insect-born parasites), trematodes, nematodes, and cestodes. Particular emphasis is given to human disease throughout the course along with host defenses, immunity and immune responses. The class includes a 3-hour laboratory session.
Prerequisites: BIOL201,BIOL20.
This course covers the history of microbiology, pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria, fungi of medical significance and the gram method of staining. Viruses are reviewed along with HIV and bacteriophages. The course includes an introduction to parasitology including protozoa (with a focus on malaria and other insect-born parasites), trematodes, nematodes, and cestodes. Particular emphasis is given to human disease throughout the course along with host defenses, immunity and immune responses. The class includes a 3-hour laboratory session.
This course is an introduction to the role of nutrition in human health. It is expected that students will be able to apply nutrition principles to daily dietary practice. Physiological processes including digestion, absorption, transport and elimination are examined. Further topics include the relationship between nutrition and pathology as well as emotional health, and appropriate nutrients for people of different ages and life stages.
Prerequisites: BIOL201,BIOL20.
Prerequisites: BIOL320.
A study of the internal workings of the cell. The molecular basis of various cell activities is emphasized. Particular attention is paid to DNA replication, protein synthesis, regulation of gene expression, and methods in molecular biology. Emphasis is placed on reading, interpreting, and critiquing peer-reviewed literature.
Prerequisites: .
A study of research design and basic statistics of relevance to biologists and health professionals. Topics covered include: scientific method and hypothesis, probability, study design, sampling, t-tests, analysis of variance, correlation and linear regression, parametric and non-parametric techniques. Emphasis will be given to biological and health examples.
Prerequisites: BIOL202.
This course explores the inner workings of the human body and how it maintains homeostasis. Emphasis is placed on understanding structure-function relationships and the interconnectedness of organ systems. Students learn quantitative laboratory techniques used by physiologists
Prerequisites: BIOL211.
These courses build on what was learned in BIOL 211. They are essentially clinical courses with some classroom learning, then using what is learned to apply in a community health education environment. Both are taken sequentially over two different semesters. Topics to be covered may include: health expo techniques, wellness and healthy living, depression recovery, diabetes education, issues of addiction including smoking, alcohol and drug education. Students will also gain experience in providing instruction to more junior students.
Prerequisites: BIOL201,BIOL20.
This course presents the basic concepts of the innate and adaptive immune systems including details about molecules, cells and organs involved. Emphasis will be placed on mechanisms of immune system development and response to pathogens, as well as on the classic experiments performed to make key discoveries in immunology.
Examination of biological, paleontological, and geological concepts central to the study of historical events in biological systems. Considers the interactions of data, theories, and extra scientific concepts in historical biology, within the particular context of a biblical worldview.
Prerequisites: CHEM302.
Topics covered include: chemical, structural, and functional properties of the major classes of biological molecules (amino acids, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleotides, nucleic acids, biological membranes), metabolic pathways, including degradation and synthesis of biochemical macromolecules.
Prerequisites: BIOL201,BIOL20.
An investigation of the microscopic structure and function of the various tissues of the human body. Students learn about histology laboratory techniques and gain experience using the light microscope.
Prerequisites: BIOL202.
This course is a comparative survey of the primary parasites of medical and veterinary importance with an emphasis on morphology, life cycles, epidemiology, pathogenesis and the interface between the parasite and the host immune system. Students will develop a global perspective of the burden of parasitic diseases and will analyze current literature in molecular parasitology topics.
Prerequisites: BIOL201,BIOL20.
This course will focus on new and cutting-edge topics in biology that are especially relevant and contemporary. Topics will change over time depending on current issues, but examples of topics to be covered include human cloning, GMOs, endemic, pandemic and emerging diseases (eg.,AIDS, Ebola, influenza), and current local and global environmental issues.

GENERAL BUSINESS
A course in the fundamentals of business law and the legal Lebanese system. Topics include obligations and contracts, negotiable instruments, and the creation and dissolution of business organizations.
A study of how business operates within the political, legal, and social environment, its relationship to government agencies and government controls, and how business relates its activities to various social problems. Ethical considerations of business decisions as related to this environment.
A study of management activities of profit as well as non-profit organizations, including planning, decision-making, organizing, leading, and controlling. The management of organizational resources.
A survey of the world environment (political, legal, economic, cultural, historical, and geographical) in which international business is conducted, including both economic relations among nations and environmental factors that affect business operations. Topics include international trade and trade restrictions, balance of payments, international monetary systems, and multinational corporations.
Prerequisites: BSAD355.
A survey of the objectives and issues associated with personnel management in organizations. Topics include studies in human resources planning and forecasting, job analysis and evaluation, personnel recruitment, selection and assessment, training and development, performance evaluation, compensation and benefits, grievance procedures and disciplinary actions.
Prerequisites: CPTR208.
This course provides conceptual understanding of the function of Blockchains as a method of securing distributed ledgers, and the new applications that they enable in accounting, finance, management, and marketing. It also examines decentralized digital currencies (cryptocurrencies) such as bitcoin, the likely interaction of cryptocurrencies with the banking, financial, legal and regulatory systems, and how cryptocurrencies could be viewed within a framework of innovation and development.
Intensive study of selected topics of current interest in the sub-discipline area noted and not ordinarily covered in depth in other courses.
Prerequisites: BSAD355,MKTG31.
A systematic study of entrepreneuring, with an emphasis on contemporary trends. The creation, assessment, development, and operation of new and merging ventures, including home-based businesses, franchises, and existing business purchases. Addresses entrepreneurial profiles and elements required to write a business plan.
Prerequisites: BSAD355.
This course focuses on the process of influencing individuals and groups toward organizational goals. Topics include evolution of leadership theory, leadership effectiveness, situational leadership, competencies required by leadership, and assessment of a leader's strengths and weaknesses. Students will be exposed to the problems that are encountered by leaders and the required behaviors, attributes, and outcomes needed to lead organizations effectively.
Advanced topics dealing with individual and organizational factors affecting employee motivation, performance, and satisfaction. Areas may include the work climate, organizational attachment, job design, goal-setting, emotional intelligence, group dynamics, and reward systems. Cases and projects.
A study of globalization and the increasing ethnic and cultural diversity in the workplace that requires managers to become more aware of and sensitive to the role of culture in business relations. Communication, negotiation, principles and practices of management in a cross-cultural context is the focus of study.
Prerequisites: BSAD355.
This course defines a project and its types. Topics include development management, project cycle management, process documentation, the concept of problem, stakeholder's analysis, budgeting, monitoring, implementation and evaluation, project formulation, and training. The course focuses on the use of Project Evaluation and Review Techniques (PERT), Critical Path Method (CPM), and others. Computer models and practices will be used to solve practical problems in organizations.
Among the subjects considered are the decision process in making investments abroad, relationships with host governments, and organizational and operating problems of the multinational corporation including setting strategic goals, personnel management, planning, communication, and control. Assumes a background in management and in the international environment of business.
Prerequisites: BSAD355.
Corequisite: BSAD355 Examines the history, theory and management of quality programs in business organizations. Topics include the quality management guiding principles of leadership commitment, customer focus, employee involvement, teamwork, continuous process improvement, and the systematic use of measurement data.
Prerequisites: STAT285.
Analysis of problems and issues faced by production/operations managers in manufacturing and service industries. Concepts and techniques include operations scheduling, quality control, plant layout, facility location, line balancing, queues, production and inventory controls, forecasting and linear programming.
A program of management experience. Student must be a Junior and have at least a B- cumulative GPA. A total of 225 hours of work experience is required. Full arrangements for a structured program must be made in advance.
The goal of this interdisciplinary course is to enable students to develop and/or fine tune skills in the analysis of strategic and organizational problems and issues.
Topics of current interest in the sub-discipline area noted not ordinarily covered in depth in other courses.
A study of fundamental concepts in financial and managerial accounting. Topics include the accounting cycle; financial statement preparation, content, and analysis; planning and control techniques; activity-based costing; job costing; and differential cost analysis. Includes an overview of the principles of financial management. A revision of concepts of raising and investing money; conducting financial statement analysis; applying the time value of money techniques to security valuation; and determining a firm's cost of capital and capital budgeting. A discussion of managerial topics that include dividend policy, capital structuring, and working capital management.
This course explores the functions, roles, and skills associated with managing people and organizations. A study of concepts and models for effective management. The course also examines the principles, concepts, and practices of marketing products. How the marketing mix (product, price, promotion, and distribution) will impact the achievement of corporate goals and objectives.
Application of behavioral sciences to management. The examination of contemporary theories and principles of human behavior. Topics include perception, personality, attitudes, emotions, motivation, leadership, decisionmaking, communication, group processes, diversity, organizational change, self-awareness, and stress management. A research paper and case analyses are required.
This course establishes the technical foundation needed to write graduate business research papers, projects, and the thesis. Topics include questionnaire design and validation, sampling criteria, qualitative and quantitative data analysis, and hypothesis testing. The style and format of research writing is emphasized.
Understanding the global enterprise and how management concepts, principles, and practice transcend national boundaries. Focus on global strategies, the importance of cultural differences to organizational effectiveness, management of people in international organizations, personnel selection and repatriation, political risks, ethics and social responsibility.
The organizational leadership ability to strategically and tactically anticipate, plan, and implement large-scale change and continuous improvement in a dynamic business environment. Analyses focus on interrelating the organization's products and services, structure, technology, and people for effective change. Coursework includes effective communications, ethics, case analyses, change-model building, and personalized planning for change.
This course focuses on the human resources function. Students learn to manage the selection and development of personnel; equal opportunity; compensation and benefits; and safety and health requirements. Topics such as union relations, grievance, and arbitration procedures are also discussed. Students analyze various human resources issues using the case study approach.
Major competitive issues and founding principles of supply-chain management, as well as techniques used to analyze various aspects of logistics systems. The design and operation of logistical systems and their components. Insights, concepts, practical tools, and decision support systems that are important for the effective management of the supply chain. Inventory management and control, communication, warehousing, distribution and customer service standards, and facility location are examined. The role of the Internet and information systems as they relate to an efficient supply chain.
Requires that students integrate relevant knowledge gleaned from previous core business-course experiences. Extensive case work and library research are demanded. Students work with a real organization to develop a comprehensive strategic plan.
A scholarly research into a topic in business. The thesis must be of sufficient quality, originality, thoughtful analysis, and substantial refinement in communication skills. It should demonstrate substantive and insightful understanding of the topic chosen, its importance to the academic community, and its relevance to the contemporary business world.

CHEMISTRY
A survey of general and organic chemistry including stoichiometry, atomic and molecular structure, bonding, states of matter, solutions, chemical kinetics and chemical equilibrium. CHEM112 includes a 3-hour laboratory session
A survey of general and organic chemistry including stoichiometry, atomic and molecular structure, bonding, states of matter, solutions, chemical kinetics and chemical equilibrium. CHEM112 includes a 3-hour laboratory session
Prerequisites: .
Corequisite: CHEM111 A 3-hour laboratory session on topics covered in CHEM111.
This is the first of a two-semester course of organic chemistry. Topics covered include: bonding principles, functional groups, isomerism, stereochemistry, nomenclature, organic reactions, nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopy. No Lab.
Lab for CHEM201
Topics covered include: matter and measurement, atoms, molecules and molecular compounds, ions and ionic compounds, stoichiometry, aqueous reactions, thermochemistry, molecular structure and bonding, matter and solutions. The class includes a 3-hour laboratory session.
Prerequisites: CHEM201.
This course builds on first semester general chemistry. Topics covered include: chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid and base chemistry, titrations, buffers, solubility, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. The class includes a 3-hour laboratory session.
Prerequisites: CHEM202.
This is the first of a two-semester course of organic chemistry. Topics covered include: bonding principles, functional groups, isomerism, stereochemistry, nomenclature, organic reactions, nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopy. The class includes a 3-hour laboratory session.
Prerequisites: CHEM301.
This is the second semester of organic chemistry which is a continuation and builds on semester I concepts. Topics covered include: UV spectroscopy, aromatic compounds and substitution reactions, continuation in analysis of organic reactions, polymers, and biomolecules including carbohydrates, amino acids, and nucleotides. The class includes a 3-hour laboratory session.

CULTURAL STUDIES
This course has been designed to examine a range of topics including the origins of civilization in Ancient Mesopotamia and Egypt, the civilization of Ancient Greece and Rome, the origins and development of Judaism, and the early Christian Church; with emphasis on the contributions to world culture: its art, literature, philosophy, science, and technology.
Development of Near Eastern civilizations. Near-eastern political, economic, religious, and cultural institutions from the beginnings to the Hellenistic era.
The development of western civilization from the Grecian culture to the end of the Middle Ages, with emphasis on the political, economic, religious, social, and cultural institutions. The course fosters an intelligent appreciation of the philosophical schools that led to the emergence of the Renaissance age.
The development of western civilization from the Renaissance age to the present time. Emphasis on the political, economic, religious, social, and cultural institutions. The course fosters an intelligent appreciation of the fine arts through the coordinated study of painting, sculpture, architecture, music, and literature, as well as science and ideology through a coordinated study of new scientific discoveries and influences on ideology.
A survey of the history and culture of the Arabs from the pre-Islamic period to the end of the Abbasid state. A combination of political, social, economic, and cultural history, as well as an examination of specific aspects of the religion of Islam. Field trips may be a part of the course.

COMMUNICATION
Prerequisites: ENLG212.
A study of the human communication process with focus on public speaking. The basic elements and principles of speech, including speech mechanism, development of communication, and construction of written speeches with an emphasis on organization, mechanics, content, and delivery. Students will prepare and deliver speeches.

COMPUTER SCIENCE

COMPUTER SCIENCE
An overview of information technology and computers?their history and use in the workplace. Topics include data processing principles and practices, computer storage, desktop computing, operating system organization and architecture, computer networks, the Internet, the web, security systems, computer viruses, disk organization, Windows and its applications, word processing and spreadsheets, programming languages, and computer programming.
This course is an introduction to computer programming using C++. Topics include problem solving using computers, data types and declarations, statements, expressions, and assignments. Basic structures, procedures and functions, and structural programming.
The course is a continuation of Computer Programming I. The goal is for students to refine and retain their programming skills. Emphasis is placed on functions, arrays, pointers, and recursion. Topics include an introduction to the object oriented features of C++ like classes, inheritance, operator overloading, file processing, and string processing.
Prerequisites: CPTR208.
Covers data communications and networking, covering hardware and software. Emphasis upon the analysis and design of PC networking applications. Management of telecommunications networks, cost-benefit analysis, and evaluation of connectivity options are also covered. Students learn to evaluate, select, and implement different communication options within an organization.
The course will introduce students to the use of algorithm, complexity, sorting, and searching algorithms, abstract data types and data structures. Topics include linear and non-linear data structures, linked lists and recursion, stacks, queues and their applications, trees, balanced trees and their implementations, maps and hashing, priority queues, graphs and their algorithms.
A comparative study of programming languages: syntax, semantics, and implementation. Students will learn and analyze the procedural, functional, logic, and object oriented paradigms through the study of representative programming languages like Pascal, C, Lisp, Prolog, C++, etc.
Machine level architecture, functional units, memory, debugging, input/output structures, storage systems, instruction sets, machine cycle, assemblers, macro-assemblers and microprocessors, machine instruction types, addressing modes, registers, cashing, machine and assembly languages.
Von Neumann architecture, machine instructions and formats, addressing techniques, microprogramming, fast arithmetic, buses, advanced and I/O practices, peripherals.
Internet and web history, architecture of web applications: web, protocols (TCP/ IP, HTTP, FTP), web technologies, and markup languages overview (HTML, DHTML, XML). Building static web pages (HTML). Cascading style sheet (CSS), Flash.
Review of protocols and architecture of web applications. Client-server, dynamic web pages (JavaScript, VBscript, DHTML). Server side programming (PHP/ASP), connectivity to a database (ADO, ODBC connectivity).
History and evolution of operating systems, process and processor management, primary and auxiliary storage management, performance evaluation, security, distributed systems. Topics include an overview of the components of an operating system, mutual exclusion and synchronization, implementation of processors, scheduling algorithms, memory management and file systems. Case studies of operating systems are also discussed.
This course covers the concept of database and database modeling. The procedure of transforming the conceptual model to logical model (relational) is introduced, the relational query language (SQL) and the procedural query language programming using PL/SQL.
Prerequisites: CPTR208.
This course provides conceptual understanding of the function of Blockchains as a method of securing distributed ledgers, and the new applications that they enable in accounting, finance, management, and marketing. It also examines decentralized digital currencies (cryptocurrencies) such as bitcoin, the likely interaction of cryptocurrencies with the banking, financial, legal and regulatory systems, and how cryptocurrencies could be viewed within a framework of innovation and development.
Intensive study of selected topics of current interest in the sub-discipline area noted and not ordinarily covered in depth in other courses.
This course will provide the students with the necessary information to provide support to the different users; from installing, configuring and troubleshooting a computer network to provide computer support. Topics such as network operation systems, protocols, TCP/IP, DNS, DHCP, Ethernet and different topologies, Routers, Switches, VLAN, LAN, will be the core of this class. Other areas like computer architecture and Virtual Machines will be explored. The practical elements of this course will be based on 2 operating systems (Linux &). Some knowledge in Linux will be helpful since this is not the common OS amongst users.
Covers the factors necessary for successful management of system development or enhancement projects. Both technical and behavioral aspects of project management are discussed. Focus is on management of development for enterprise-level systems.
Corequisites: INFS318, INFS428, INFS447 Advanced course in systems analysis and design. An integration of previous coursework and an exploration of new issues in information systems. Topics include problem analysis, software design, coding, work breakdown structure, testing, system implementation in a computer-aided software engineering (CASE) environment, and team development using modern management techniques. A complete project is required including presentations, demonstrations, and reports. The course will also improve awareness of professionalism and ethical responsibilities.
An introduction to the basics of electronic business. Focuses on how e-business is carried out, including marketing, web design, electronic retailing, the advantages and disadvantages of this form of commerce, the infrastructures in place to support this type of electronic business, and the global economy within which it takes place. The course focuses on information, business, technology, and the integrated set of activities used to run most organizations. These activities constitute customer relationship management, supply chain management, enterprise resource planning, and outsourcing.
Prerequisite: Senior Standing This course examines selected topics in artificial intelligence (AI) and expert systems. Intelligence fundamentals and basic concepts of artificial intelligence: heuristic, intelligent agents (search-based agents, logic-based agents), propositional logic, predicate calculus, first order logic, inference, natural language processing, planning, uncertainty and decision-making (fuzzy logic), machine learning.
Prerequisite: Senior Standing The development of Intelligent Systems and the role they play in the organization. Topics include development of decision support and expert systems, decision support framework, decision processes, design and development, architecture and networking, rule-based systems, and web-based DSS. Students learn how to design a decision support system, which can make decisions on the basis of simple information and how these systems help solve business problems. The course tackles issues related to the role of data warehousing and data mining in modern enterprise business contexts.
The concepts and practice of knowledge. Defines and differentiates between knowledge, data, and information and between knowledge management and information management. Topics include intranets, groupware, weblogs, instant messaging, content management systems, and email in both individual and organizational contexts. The course also covers knowledge creation, codification, transfer, capturing knowledge technologies, and ethical issues and problems inherent in knowledge management.
Prerequisite: Senior Standing Strings and languages, regular sets, finite automata, Kleene's theorem, languages and grammars, Chomsky classification, Turing machines, and complexity.
A program of information systems experience. Student must be a Junior and have at least a B- cumulative GPA. A total of 225 hours of work experience is required. Full arrangements for a structured program must be made in advance.
Prerequisite: Senior Standing and approval of the department chairperson A project chosen in consultation with the faculty member. The student will defend the project during an oral examination.
Topics of current interest in the sub-discipline area noted not ordinarily covered in depth in other courses.

ECONOMICS
Theory and analysis of determination of economic conditions at the national level. Topics include an overview of macroeconomics, measuring national output and income, consumption and investment, the multiplier model, money and commercial banking, central banking and monetary policy, business cycles and unemployment, inflation and unemployment, economic growth, and price stability.
The course deals with the nature and scope of economics, consumer behavior, allocation of resources, theories of the firm, production, price analysis, resource allocation, demand theory, market imperfections, analysis of cost, and long-run supply.
Prerequisites: ECON225,ECON22.
The development of economic thinking and analytical techniques from late medieval times to the present. Emphasis is placed on concurrent developments in the social, intellectual, and scientific concerns and attitudes that have stimulated the nature and direction of economic inquiry.
Prerequisites: ECON225,ECON22.
Commercial banking, the operation and controls of the Central Bank of Lebanon, as well as other central banks, money and credit in circulation, and the effect of monetary policies.
Prerequisites: ECON226.
An application of economic principles to the health-care industry. Demand for and supply of health-care services are analyzed to determine their effect on cost. Examines the impact of insurance, technology, and regulation on the industry.
Prerequisites: STAT285.
Topics include probability sampling, hypothesis testing, regression techniques, and problems of multicollinearity, heteroscedasticity, and auto-correlation.
Prerequisites: ECON225,ECON22.
Prerequisites: ECON225,ECON22.
A description and theoretical analysis of international trade, balance-ofpayments accounts, the mechanisms of international economic adjustment, the theory of comparative advantage, and economic integration.
The study of global macroeconomic issues facing firms. Within the context of competing economic theories, the course considers domestic policies, international trade and payment issues, economic growth, international institutions and the spread of regional crises, and the impact of stabilization policies on firms. Development of a spreadsheet model of an economy is required.
The use of economic theory and optimization techniques as tools of management decision making within a business firm are studied. Statistical analyses such as regression techniques will be utilized. While microeconomics serves as a foundation, emphasis on quantitative approaches also requires knowledge of basic calculus and statistics.

EDUCATION
An orientation to the teaching profession in a multicultural society. It includes the philosophical/ethical assumptions underlying different education philosophies and the social, cultural, and instructional aspects of education. Analysis of educational philosophies and practices.
An introduction to the basic methods and techniques of instruction, planning, and classroom management. Emphasis is on acquisition and application of an instructional framework and classroom management. Procedures for creating a productive classroom environment.
This course reviews the historical and theoretical implementation of religious education in the church, school, and family settings. A study of the teaching and discipling mandates of the gospel commission, and the principles of integrating faith and learning.
An exploration and a study of contemporary vital issues and concerns in education. Topics of current significance to school instruction.
Prerequisites: EDTE220.
A study of the theory and practice in a variety of methods for teaching reading with classroom observation, demonstration, and participation. A study of specialized reading skills needed to handle the content area.
Prerequisites: EDTE220.
Application of principles integrating art, music, and physical education instruction in the elementary curriculum.
Prerequisites: .
The course focuses on the use of a wide variety of instructional technology and media to support student learning with emphasis on the application of technologies to effective teaching. Topics include technology as a tool, Internet in the classroom, standards for integrating technology and multimedia teaching tools, and facilitating students' use of technology.
Prerequisites: EDTE220.
Focuses on teaching strategies on the secondary level. A study of aims, principles, methods, and management of instruction. Emphasis on developing a repertoire of strategies that enhances a variety of learning outcomes in students. A blend of theory and pract
Prerequisites: EDTE220.
Theory and practice in methods for teaching history, geography, and civics with classroom observation, demonstration, and participation.
Prerequisites: EDTE220.
Theory and practice in methods for teaching mathematics with classroom observation, demonstration, and participation.
Prerequisites: EDTE220.
Theory and practice in methods for teaching science with classroom observation, demonstration, and participation.
Prerequisites: EDTE220.
Theory and practice in methods for teaching the Arabic language with classroom observation, demonstration, and participation.
Prerequisites: EDTE220.
Specialized techniques of modern language teaching applied to spoken and written English as a second language.
Prerequisites: EDTE220.
A study of the religion curriculum, with emphasis on instructional theory, learning strategies, and proper teaching. The development of necessary skills and expertise vital for success in Bible instruction.
Prerequisites: EDTE220.
An introductory study of the nature, conditions, and outcomes of human learning, with emphasis on the psychological factors.
The writing of instructional objectives, the preparation of classroom test to measure the attainment of those objectives, the concepts of reliability and validity, simple item analysis, interpreting tests and data from standardized tests, grading, and reporting.
Theory and practice regarding curriculum organization of learning experiences, methods, materials, and instructional aids for teaching. Students will be exposed to the design, development, implementation, analysis, improvement, and evaluation of curricula at any level.
Prerequisite: Senior Standing The characteristics and educational needs of learners from various backgrounds (the gifted and the handicapped). Promoting awareness and knowledge about the nature of exceptional learners, and specific teaching strategies suitable in meeting these students' needs.
Application of teaching theory in the classroom. Supervised teaching experience and feedback in a school setting. Involves observation and full participation in actual teaching situations.
Prerequisite: Senior Standing and approval of the department chairperson An independent research in education chosen in consultation with the advisor. A research paper of 15 pages per credit is required. The student will also defend the paper's findings in an oral examination.
This course examines the philosophical and historical bases of major worldviews and critiques the impact of naturalism and post-modernism on education.
An examination of the relationship of progressive instructional strategies to learning styles through methods, curricula, and materials. The implications of learning-style-concepts and suggesting learner-centered instructional strategies for accommodating varied learning styles in the classroom.
A study of methods and procedures of research in the field of education. Formulating and stating the problem; planning, designing, and implementing research; collecting and analyzing data; and reporting research.
An exploration of emerging trends and research in public and private education. Students are challenged to understand controversial issues and to become aware of possible alternative solutions. The topics are not necessarily covered in the degree's courses.
The integration of technology in learning environments. Technology-related issues from faculty and student perspectives. Issues include the philosophy of and need for technology, learning outcomes associated with the use of technology, implementation of and problems associated with technology in the instructional environment, and technology related to professional development.
A survey of the curriculum, methodology, and research-based strategies used in teaching the English language. Topics include the development of knowledge and skills in defining objectives, planning instruction, assessment, measurement, and program evaluation.
The knowledge and skills needed in teaching reading. An examination of the specific components of the reading process, the appropriate methods and materials for teaching reading instruction, the assessment of students' strengths and weaknesses relative to the reading act, the development of curriculum objectives, and the planning of instruction.
The contemporary methods of teaching writing in schools. Topics include rhetorical processes; writing to learn and think; motivating, structuring, and assigning writing; responding to students' writing; assessment, grading, and testing; grammar, linguistics, conventions, and correctness; and technology in the teaching of writing.
This course provides an examination of measurement as it applies to student performance in the classroom, as well as a review of current practices and trends in assessment in the schools. Topics include quantitative and qualitative measures such as standardized testing, criterion-referenced tests, teachermade tests, rubrics, and portfolios.
Theories of curriculum development, the prominent curricular designs utilized in contemporary education, and the processes and procedures of supervising curriculum change, follow-through, and evaluation.
A study of practices and trends in educational programming for all exceptional students. Topics include the development of knowledge and skills in defining objectives, planning instruction, assessment, evaluation of children with special needs, and program evaluation.
An orientation to the organization and administration of educational programs and institutions in the public and private sectors; the organizational structure and control of school systems; the nature of administration; the foundations of educational leadership; and leadership and ethical behavior, management theory and practice.
The improvement of teaching and learning by professional supervision; the role, aims, and principles of instructional supervision; a study of supervisory techniques.
The steps necessary to build an effective school budget and the legal foundations of public and private education. The financial and economic issues affecting educational institutions, the legal issues affecting teachers and administrators, teacher employment, and school-board operations and procedures.
An examination of the human resources concepts and practices associated with developing and managing an effective education team. Different approaches to personnel administration and management, motivation, professional development, and performances are addressed, along with obstacles to effective team development.
A scholarly research into a topic in education. The thesis must be of sufficient quality, originality, thoughtful analysis, and substantial refinement in communication skills. It should demonstrate substantive and insightful understanding of the topic chosen, its importance to the academic community, and its relevance to the contemporary world of education.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE
A remedial university-level English course focused on developing the necessary language and academic skills for success in regular classes taught in English. The course reviews grammar, usage, punctuation and vocabulary, as well as reading comprehension and retention, and academic writing and presentation skills. Not counted towards any degree.
A review of sentence structure and mechanics. Emphasis on expository essay writing and editing as a recursive process for generating meaning and communicating effectively. The course includes note taking and oral presentations.
Prerequisites: ENLG211.
An emphasis on argumentative/persuasive writing, summarizing, analyzing, and reading from a critical perspective. The course includes classroom debate.
Prerequisites: .
Corequisites: ENLG212, INFS210 Emphasis on an interdepartmental approach to major papers or projects in the area of the student's specialty, with a review of library and research skills and styles. A step-by-step application of the basic research methodology. Students will defend their research product in an oral examination.
Prerequisites: ENLG212.
Finding, arranging, and presenting evidence to support a given position in argumentation. Includes classical and modern theories. Emphasis is given to the practical applications of rhetorical analysis in various contexts including mass media, advertising, and literary and political representations.
Prerequisite: ENLG212 An introduction to the nature of human language, the importance of language in society, and language variation and change. Includes an in-depth study of relationships between language and culture, dialects, and differences between oral and written communication.
Prerequisites: ENLG212.
An introduction to linguistics, which is the scientific study of language. Topics include language and the brain, grammatical aspects of language such as morphology, syntax, and semantics; phonetics and phonology; psychological aspects such as language acquisition and processing; and language and society topics such as language change and writing systems, and differences between oral and written communication.
Prerequisites: ENLG211.
An introductory literature course that familiarizes students with different genres of literature in English including poetry, the essay, drama, autobiography, the novel, short story, etc. Students will be able to analyze, critique, and write about literature.
Prerequisites: ENLG211.
A survey of poetry, non-fiction and fiction works for children and adolescents. Includes selection, analysis, and evaluation of works appropriate for specific ages and language abilities, and potential educational applications.
Prerequisites: ENLG211.
A survey of English literature and poetry from around the world, including the Middle East. Topics include the modern novel, stream of consciousness, and postmodern selections, as well as traditional international favorites.
Prerequisites: ENLG211.
A recognition of the power of performance to change people's lives and the artistic, educational, social, and political power of performance to facilitate understanding and growth in our lives. The course will include the study of the genres and history of drama, acting techniques, methods of speaking with clear diction and poise, the role of imagination, and ways of engaging the audience. Activities will include a public performance of a well-known play.
Prerequisites: ENLG212.
A foray into the forms and techniques of writing fictional and non-fictional short stories, essays, poetry, and drama.
Prerequisite: ENLG220
Prerequisites: ENLG212.
Introduces students to writing in a journalistic style. Includes the basics of journalistic writing for various media (newspapers, radio, television, and Internet), public relations, press releases, basic features, and editorials. This course emphasizes the importance of audience for any written communication as well as the values of timeliness, objectivity, and fairness.
Prerequisites: ENLG212.
Current issues in the field of teaching and tutoring writing in primary and secondary English classes. This course includes the study of composition as a discipline, and strategies for teaching writing. Requirements include practice in teaching and tutoring writing skills.
Prerequisites: ENLG230.
A study of the social and anthropological side of linguistics. Includes topics such as literacy, multilingualism, globalization, power, identity, gender, gestures, and other pragmatic aspects of language.
Prerequisites: ENLG230.
A theoretical and practical introduction to the broad range of human speech sounds (tone, intonation, stress, articulatory phonetics, and phonemics). Traditional and modern phonological theory and analysis. Includes practical applications for teaching speaking and pronunciation.
Prerequisites: EDTE220.
An overview of the historical development of language teaching methods over time. Principles and best practices of modern English language teaching. Includes classroom observation, materials selection and design, and an introduction to techniques for teaching speaking, listening, reading, writing, and grammar.
Prerequisites: ENLG230.
Theories of second language acquisition in children and adults; comparison of first and second language acquisition including psychological, social, and individual factors. Includes concepts of EFL/ESL curricular approaches and applications of language learning theory in the classroom.
Prerequisites: ENLG250.
Reading and analysis of major literary genres, authors, and works, focusing on selected British literature from the beginnings to the modern era, exclusive of Shakespeare.
Prerequisites: ENLG250.
A study of selections from William Shakespeare's plays, sonnets, and poems. The course also presents some of Shakespeare's contemporary writers like Christopher Marlow and Ben Johnson.
Prerequisites: ENLG250.
Reading and analysis of major literary genres, authors, and works, focusing on American literature from its beginnings to the modern era.
Prerequisites: ENLG220.
A capstone writing workshop covering a wide variety of writing genres. Writing tasks in this course will mainly focus on authentic situations that are typically encountered in daily life, including editorials, op-ed pieces, critical reviews, and other nonfiction works. Students will create original writing, analyze, respond to, and edit the works of others, and learn to polish their own work in preparation for publication.
Prerequisites: ENLG230.
An advanced review of the basic parts of speech, verb tenses, sentence constituents, as well as unusual features of English such as phrasal verbs, slang, and idioms from a pedagogical point of view. A brief introduction to the basic features of structural and transformational English grammar. A discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of different theories of grammar instruction. An introduction to methods of teaching grammar in the second and foreign language classroom.
Prerequisites: ENLG230.
This course focuses on the history of the English language, tracing changes in its inflections, syntax, phonology, spelling, and lexicon. All these will be considered against the background of cultural and historical developments, as well as recent trends related to the use of English as a global language.
Prerequisites: ENLG220.
A historical review of the different literary theories from Plato to the Romantic Movement and on through modern times. The examination of philosophical and socio-political backgrounds and trends, and the derivation of practical tools for literary analysis from them. Frequent reading and writing assignments allow students to apply diverse critical theories to the analysis of selected works of literature.
Prerequisites: Senior Standing and approval of the department chairperson An independent research in the English language chosen in consultation with the faculty advisor. A research paper of 15 pages per credit is required. The student will also defend the paper's findings in an oral examination.
A survey of the history of linguistics from the Ancient Grammarians to the present day. This course focuses on the development of various schools of linguistics during the 19th and 20th century, from De Saussure to Chomsky.
The research areas such as speech perception, word recognition, sentence and discourse processing, speech production, and language acquisition. Major research findings and theories in each area will be discussed in class, in addition to the relationship between theoretical linguistics concepts and constructs, and psycholinguistic data.
An examination of the science of linguistic meaning. The two branches to this discipline are: semantics (the study of conventional, ?compositional? meaning) and pragmatics (the study of interactional meaning or how meaning is conveyed). This course is of interdisciplinary interest since it has other contributories as well: philosophy, logic, syntax, and psychology.
This course is designed for those currently teaching or planning to teach English as a Second Language (ESL) programs. Students will begin by examining learning theories and second language acquisition. It includes ESL curriculum approaches, teaching methods, and materials design.
This course is a study of methods and procedures of research in the field of English. Formulating and stating the problem; planning, designing, and implementing research; collecting and analyzing data; and reporting research.
The writing processes of professional writers, writing venues, analysis of publication specifications, revision strategies, and working in a community of writers. Students are expected to produce/revise and submit a piece to a publication.
The three important kinds of discourse analysis are included in this course: conversation analysis, critical discourse approaches, and rhetorically-influenced approaches (discursive psychology, action-implicative discourse analysis). Students will learn to do original discourse analysis.
An analysis of the types of errors made by second language learners with special emphasis on both first-language (traditionally known as contrastive analysis) and second-language interference, with a discussion of other sources of error. Emphasis on theoretical implications of these for a theory of second language learning.
The grammatical structures of written English and the kinds of textual environments that motivate this structure. The grammatical constructions such as cleft sentence, passive, and relative clause from the point of view of their functions in discourse, which helps students put this critical thinking about grammar and style into practice.
This course covers topics that have received a lot of attention in the English language in the past few years. Topics discussed may include learning versus acquisition, accuracy versus fluency, classroom interaction, individual differences, and computer-assisted instruction.
Prerequisite: approval of the department chairperson A scholarly research into a topic in the English language. The thesis must be of sufficient quality, originality, thoughtful analysis, and substantial refinement in communication skills. It should demonstrate substantive and insightful understanding of the topic chosen, its importance to the academic community, and its relevance to the contemporary world of English language.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE INSTITUTE
An introductory course in grammar, providing an overview of and an introduction to the structure of the English language. Emphasis is placed on sentence types, basic sentence constituents, parts of speech, and verb tenses.
An introductory aural/oral skills course, covering the sounds, rhythms, and intonation of the English language, as well as conversation and presentation skills, basic idioms and figurative language, note-taking skills, and listening competence.
An introductory writing course. Emphasis is placed on sentence patterns, basic grammar, and multiple writing formats.
An introductory reading course. Emphasis is placed on phonemic awareness, sight word recognition, phonics, word analysis, reading strategies, and decoding of written language as tools to achieve reading comprehension and fluency.
A progressive development of English grammar structures, with focus on verb tenses, parts of speech, modals, and clauses. Emphasis is placed on correct grammar usage in real-life situations.
Speaking and listening skills with a focus on fluency and accuracy. The course emphasizes vocabulary expansion, and developing the listening, conversation, and presentation skills needed for effective communication in academic settings.
The development of the writing skills necessary to produce coherent academic text. The course introduces paragraph writing, with an extensive review of sentence patterns, paragraphs, transitional expressions, and punctuation rules. Students are exposed to the concepts of writing as a process, and different types of paragraphs.
Reading with an emphasis on academic texts. The course focuses on the development of the vocabulary, comprehension, retention, and analytical skills necessary for success in university courses.
A review of advanced English grammatical forms and functions, with emphasis on fluency and accuracy. Includes a review of the English verb tenses, modals, active and passive voice, different types of clauses, and conditionals.
The transition from paragraph to essay writing with an emphasis on the development of academic writing skills, fluency, accuracy, and critical thinking. Students will learn to write different types of essays and to strengthen their work by using the words of others while avoiding plagiarism.
Advanced development of vocabulary and the analytical and critical thinking skills needed for reading, analyzing, discussing, and presenting academic topics. Includes testing for comprehension and retention, as well as written and oral presentations based on the readings.
(3 cr.) Focused and intensive review and preparation for the TOEFL. The course includes advanced review, correction, and timed practice in grammar, listening comprehension, reading comprehension, structure/written expression and speaking as included in the PBT, CBT, and iBT TOEFL examinations.

FINANCE AND BANKING
Designed to explore the management of personal finances and to help the student understand household budgeting, the use and cost of credit, life, property and umbrella insurance, individual taxation, housing, estate planning, savings and investing. This course emphasizes the principles of stewardship; the recognition that our financial assets are God-given to not only satisfy our needs and wants, but to also be a blessing to others.
Prerequisites: .
A managerial approach to financial analysis, planning, and control. Management of working capital, long-term assets, and long-term financing.
Prerequisites: FNCE317.
An integrative approach to financial planning incorporating time value of money, financial statements, federal taxation, risk management and insurance concepts. Emphasis will be placed on developing a framework for formulating sound financial plans.
Prerequisites: FNCE317.
The theory of futures pricing and options pricing, and the application of the theory to develop a framework for analyzing hedging and investment decisions using futures and options. Attention to practical considerations in the use of these investments.
Prerequisites: FNCE317.
The techniques, vehicles, and strategies for implementing investment goals in light of risk-return tradeoffs. Key factors that determine the composition of the individual or institutional portfolios emphasized.
Prerequisites: FNCE317.
A study of more advanced topics in corporate finance and an application of previously covered topics with the use of cases.
Prerequisites: FNCE317.
The financial management of international enterprises. Short- and long-term capital sources and uses. Capital budgeting in changing foreign exchange conditions. Exchange exposure coverage, taxation impacts, and global-risk diversification.
Prerequisites: FNCE317.
Theories and techniques for management of portfolios; emphasis on the portfolio manager's role in diversification and meeting investors' goals, and a review of empirical literature.
Prerequisites: FNCE317.
The dynamic nature of international banking focusing on the main institutions and markets in which international banks are involved: commercial banking, investment banking, retail and private banking, and offshore banking. Risk management in international banking: bank failure, supervision and regulation, money laundering, derivatives, country risk, and global debt crisis.
A program of finance experience. Student must be a Junior and have at least a B- cumulative GPA. A total of 225 hours of work experience is required. Full arrangements for a structured program must be made in advance.
An overview of the concepts, theories, and practices of business valuation. Topics include valuation approaches; company information-gathering methods; economic and industry analysis; and financial statement analysis. Discussions of appropriate discounts; valuations for special purposes; publicly traded firms; discounted cash flow valuation (DCF); valuation by multiples using comparables; contingent claims valuation; mergers and acquisitions; and multinational project and firm valuations.
This course introduces the practical uses of interest rate swaps, credit derivatives, and financial futures and options on bonds, stock indexes, and foreign currencies. The focus of the course is on the relationships between derivatives and their underlying cash markets, analytical modeling, and on the correct use of swaps, futures, credit derivatives, and options for hedging and trading.
A study of the financial, regulatory and economic environment in which banks and other financial institutions operate. Topics include the competitive aspects of the financial services industry in comparison with non-financial service organizations; the internal operations of banks; analysis of a bank's financial statements; a bank's investment function; as well as the marketing of banking services.
An advanced study of major topics in corporate financial management. These topics include valuation of financial assets, investment in long-term assets, capital structure, dividend policy, working capital management, and other specialized topics, such as risk management, and international finance.
Financial theory and empirical evidence for making investment decisions. Topics include portfolio theory; equilibrium models of security prices (including the capital asset pricing model and the arbitrage pricing theory); the empirical behavior of security prices; market efficiency; performance evaluation; and behavioral finance.

GRAPHIC DESIGN AND DIGITAL MEDIA
A study of the arts?painting, sculpting, and architecture. The major historical, cultural, and intellectual movements of each period are outlined to provide a context for the various visual cultures. Periods range from pre-historic times to the present day. The evolution of art through the development and impact of major civilizations.
Freehand drawing while emphasizing on developing observational and expressive skills, perceiving ratios and proportions, and manual rendering techniques. The course covers still-life objects, drawing the human figure, along with basics in perspective drawing.
An exploration of the design elements, principles, basics, and rules. Commercial printing process color system and the preparation of artwork for printing. Samples will be presented to learn how top designs are created, designed, and constructed.
Prerequisites: GDDM235.
This course teaches students how to create brochures, logos, banners, and posters. Samples will be presented for solving design problems according to methods and rules previously previewed. Application software such as Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator are used.
A study of raster graphic fundamentals as they apply to scanned images. Image manipulation, restoration, tonal enhancement, on-screen graphics, and image acquisitions and output.
Basic introduction to the principles of digital photography. Digital SLRs are used to explore the technical and aesthetic issues involved in the process of making photos. Consideration will be given to digital workflow, managing data, and creating visually appealing photographs.
Students will learn how to create conceptual illustrations, typographical shapes, and logos. Foundation skills in a raster-based computer environment are acquired and developed. Samples will be presented to learn how top designs are created, designed, and constructed.
Prerequisites: GDDM248.
The history of typography. Designs and rules are explored to understand the styles used in letter shaping and composition. Foundation typographic skills are applied to situations involving the use of type in design and applications.
Prerequisites: GDDM242,GDDM23.
This course is an introduction to the field of web design. Students are exposed to the foundations of web design and animation process.
Prerequisite: Senior Standing A series that deals with interactive screen design, publication design, advertising and packaging design, corporate identity, and environmental graphics. This course gives students a practical experience in graphic design, computer applications, and brain-storming process for divergent thinking.

HEALTH EDUCATION
The basic factors contributing to holistic health and what constitutes a healthy lifestyle are considered. Principles needed to achieve and maintain good health are explored.


ISLAMIC STUDIES
An introductory course in comparative study of the Bible and the Qur'an focusing on principles of interpretation, text, inner logic, worldview and themes, and how they might be utilized when sharing faith with a Muslim.
An exploration of major social, political, ethical, religious, and intellectual trends in the contemporary Islamic world towards a deeper understanding of their existential implications for the contemporary Muslim and ministering to their needs.
A survey of Adventist worldview and faith together with its major themes in relation to Qur'anic/Islamic worldview and its themes.
An introductory course in understanding spiritual life in an Arabic context, providing personal interaction with the Arabic language Bible in terms of words, themes, phrases, nuances and implications and the power of personal spiritual life and biblical witness in proportion to one's grasp of the spiritual/moral vocabulary and expressions of the Arab soul.
An introductory practicum, which focuses on the dynamic and vital way in which the student can interact meaningfully with an individual professing the Muslim faith. It introduces students to approaches that best meet the physical, emotional, intellectual, and spiritual needs of people as well as unique crosscultural interactions and approaches towards living among and working with Muslims.
An examination of history, writings, personalities, and religious divisions and movements in Islam.
A study of the holy writings in Christianity and Islam and other Adventist and Muslim sources of faith such as the Spirit of Prophecy, the Hadith, and Islamic tafsir. Comparative study of the Bible and the Qur'an. Exegetical and hermeneutical principles applied to the Bible and the Qur'an. Biblical and Qur'anic exegesis: text, content and intertext, and how they might be utilized when sharing faith with a Muslim.
A study of the holy writings in Christianity and Islam and other Adventist and Muslim sources of faith such as the Spirit of Prophecy, the Hadith, and Islamic tafsir. Comparative study of the Bible and the Qur'an. Exegetical and hermeneutical principles applied to the Bible and the Qur'an. Biblical and Qur'anic exegesis: text, content and intertext, and how they might be utilized when sharing faith with a Muslim.
A study of the holy writings in Christianity and Islam and other Adventist and Muslim sources of faith such as the Spirit of Prophecy, the Hadith, and Islamic tafsir. Comparative study of the Bible and the Qur'an. Exegetical and hermeneutical principles applied to the Bible and the Qur'an. Biblical and Qur'anic exegesis: text, content and intertext, and how they might be utilized when sharing faith with a Muslim.
A study of method and procedures of research. Formulating and stating the problem; planning, designing and implementing research; collecting and analyzing data; and reporting research.
Prerequisites: ALNG501.
A closer reading of the Arabic Bible and the Arabic Qur'an as well as some classical Hadith and Sirah with the necessary grammatical analysis and explanation. Basic exegetical study of the Qur'an and the Arabic Bible. A glossary of words essential for ministry in the Islamic context. The purpose of this course is further developing the student's proficiency in reading and understanding Qur'anic Arabic in order to interact spiritually with Muslims and to utilize effectively the Scriptures of the "People of the Book" in the language of Islam.
Prerequisites: .
A closer reading of the Arabic Bible and the Arabic Qur'an as well as some classical Hadith and Sirah with the necessary grammatical analysis and explanation. Basic exegetical study of the Qur'an and the Arabic Bible. A glossary of words essential for ministry in the Islamic context. The purpose of this course is further developing the student's proficiency in reading and understanding Qur'anic Arabic in order to interact spiritually with Muslims and to utilize effectively the Scriptures of the "People of the Book" in the language of Islam.
An in-depth study of cultural patterns of Islamic society from an anthropological and religious perspective: male/female, shame/honor, language/silence, family life, birth, marriage, divorce and education, Shar'iah, and practices of folk Islam.
An in-depth study of cultural patterns of Islamic society from an anthropological and religious perspective: male/female, shame/honor, language/silence, family life, birth, marriage, divorce and education, Shar'iah, and practices of folk Islam.
An exploration of the major social, political, and intellectual trends in contemporary Islam, and theological and social interaction between Islam and Christianity with the emphasis on dialog and its importance in Christian-Muslim relations.
Analysis of the key Adventist doctrines in relation to Islamic doctrines.
The practicum focuses on the dynamic and vital way in which the student can have a meaningful interchange with an individual professing the Muslim faith. It introduces the student to approaches that best meet the physical, emotional, intellectual, and spiritual needs of people as well as unique cross-cultural interactions and approaches towards living among and working with Muslims. Requirements include a visit to a mosque and an Islamic center in the area where students come from and involvement in a program of dialogue and participation in events in the district.
The practicum focuses on the dynamic and vital way in which the student can have a meaningful interchange with an individual professing the Muslim faith. It introduces the student to approaches that best meet the physical, emotional, intellectual, and spiritual needs of people as well as unique cross-cultural interactions and approaches towards living among and working with Muslims. Requirements include a visit to a mosque and an Islamic center in the area where students come from and involvement in a program of dialogue and participation in events in the district.
Prerequisite: approval of the department chairperson A scholarly research into a topic in Islamic studies. The thesis must be of sufficient quality, originality, thoughtful analysis, and substantial refinement in communication skills. It should demonstrate substantive and insightful understanding of the topic chosen, its importance to the academic community, and its relevance to the contemporary world of Christian-Muslim Relations.

MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS
Integers, fractions, ratios, sets, linear equations and inequalities, integer exponents, scientific notation, polynomial equations, factoring, rational equations, absolute value, quadratic equations and inequalities, roots and radicals, rational exponents, functions and graphs, rate of change, and graphing.
Prerequisites: MATH115.
Coordinate system, lines in the plane, functions and graphs, linear and polynomial functions, rational functions, limits, continuity, derivatives, differentiation, maxima and minima problems, antiderivatives and integrals, techniques of integration, transcendental functions, and inverse functions and their derivatives.
Prerequisites: MATH116.
Techniques of integration, improper integrals, multiple integrals, Taylor and Maclaurin series, functions of two or more variables, partial derivatives, polar coordinate, differential equations, and hyperbolic functions.
Logical reasoning, sets, relations and functions, mathematical induction, counting and simple finite probability theory, modular arithmetic and arithmetic in different bases, recurrence relations, truth tables and switching circuits, graphs and trees, and strings and languages.
Prerequisites: MATH221.
Linear systems, matrices, and their applications, determinants, vector spaces, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, linear transformations and algebraic properties, orthogonal matrices, normed spaces, and diagonalization.
An introduction to statistical concepts used in education and the social sciences. The course will provide a basic understanding of commonly used descriptive and inferential statistics, such as one might need for reading and understanding primary research results. It also includes basic statistical procedures and the fundamental theories behind them, including practice with statistical software in actual data analysis and the interpretation of results.
Probability of events, axioms of probability, conditioning and independence, random variable and expectations, discrete and continuous distributions, moment generating functions, the central limit theorem, confidence intervals, estimation, testing of statistical hypotheses, and regression and correlation.
Prerequisites: MATH235,MATH24.
Introduces techniques of numerical analysis: number representations and roundoff errors, root finding, interpolation and extrapolation, approximation of functions, numerical integration, numerical differentiation, and Monte Carlo methods.

MARKETING
This course focuses on the contribution of the functions of marketing to any business organization. The course covers topics in buyer behavior, products, channels of distribution, promotion, and pricing and social issues in marketing. Students will also learn about managing customer relationships, services, public relations, direct marketing, product life-cycle, and branding. In addition, students will be exposed to the changes that face our world today because of the digital age revolution and e-marketing.
Prerequisites: MKTG310.
This course observes the reasons behind the way consumers act in the marketplace. Topics covered in this course include attitudes and beliefs, perception, interpretation, learning, personality, communication, cultural values and norms, social class, and cultural and gender diversity. The consumer decision-making process is evaluated from an individual and group perspective. In brief, the course describes the behavioral sciences to marketing.
Prerequisites: MKTG310.
A general survey of the major marketing methods, institutions, and practices examined from the viewpoint of their effects on exchange transactions linking producers with consumers. Assumes a working knowledge of micro-economics.
Prerequisites: MKTG310.
Marketing goods and services directly to consumers, marketing through ecommerce, catalogs, direct-mail, telemarketing, kiosk shopping, TV and radio direct response, magazine and newspaper direct response.
Prerequisites: MKTG310.
Emphasizes the ethical challenges that confront the decision maker and their impact on society at large as well as ethically-based contemporary issues. Marketing ethics topics include: survey of ethical decision-making theories, organizational processes, ethics research, and case histories. Contemporary issues are constantly updated.
Prerequisites: MKTG310,MKTG36.
An integrative capstone course for marketing majors. Emphasizes process by which marketing managers seek solutions to marketing problems and considers marketing opportunities. Field studies provide students with opportunities to apply knowledge gained in marketing course work to concrete situations. Assumes completion of majority of courses in marketing major.
Prerequisites: MKTG310.
Examines the meaning and role of marketing concepts and tools in nonprofit institutions such as hospitals, schools, public agencies, foundations, and churches. The role of activities such as marketing research, product development, pricing, advertising, publicity, personal selling, and marketing control are examined in the non-profit sector.
Prerequisites: MKTG310.
Designed to help students increase awareness of the retailing process, understand the changes in customer needs, demographics, and shopping behaviors, assess the emerging technologies which have a dramatic effect on retail operations, and analyze the strategic long-term plans which retailers are using for creating advantages in this rapidly changing environment.
Prerequisites: STAT285,MKTG31.
Focuses on the systematic collection of business and marketing-related data to provide information to decision makers. Emphasis on translating management problems into research questions, developing a research design to address these questions, and analyzing research results with recommendations to management.
Prerequisites: MKTG310.
Marketing problems arising from various degrees of foreign involvement. Includes marketing research, project planning and development, pricing, promotion, distribution, and organization. Emphasis on management of these marketing functions in a multinational context where the parameters differ from those in domestic marketing.
A program of marketing experience. Student must be a Junior and have at least a B- cumulative GPA. A total of 225 hours of work experience is required. Full arrangements for a structured program must be made in advance.
Topics of current interest in the business area not ordinarily covered in-depth in regular courses.
The distinct needs and problems of service organizations/industries in the area of marketing. Topics include the difference between marketing services vs. manufacturing organizations; the marketing mix for service organizations; market research in services; managing demand in services; integrated services marketing communication; services pricing; and the overlap of marketing/ operations/human resources systems in service organizations.
A study of various e-marketing methods such as electronic advertising, direct email, electronic commerce, and Web-based strategies used to reach customers and build individual relationships. Customer value analysis to determine the individual customer's contribution to profit; Web metrics; and analysis of customer/buyer values.
The elemental decisions about message design given different managerial objectives. It investigates the role of advertising in one particularly important objective, brand-building. Using a discussion of current marketing research, focuses on the importance of consumer perception in advertising/branding efficacy and integrated marketing communications (IMC) as an emerging goal in advertising efforts.
The elements of message design, creation, and transmission of various modes of business communications. Forms of authoring while building communication skills for internal and external audiences. Varying formats will include document types such as marketing, crisis communication, image and mission, and social responsibility as well as customer documents, compliance auditing, digital documentation, newspaper releases, training materials, and other media and business documentation. The design of persuasive, informational, narrative, and other categories of organizational messages are studied.
Designed to help students think like a marketing strategist to recognize marketing problems, analytically evaluate possible alternatives, and creatively institute strategic solutions. Analysis of contemporary marketing problems, currently corporate marketing strategies and case analysis are used to achieve course objectives.

Mone

PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Various methods of body development, physical fitness, and the proper way to conduct, organize, and participate in physical activities. Meets two periods per week.
Instruction in the fundamental skills of ground strokes, serving, and team play. Basic strategy and rules. Meets two periods per week.
Instruction in the fundamental skills of ground strokes, serving, and team play. Basic strategy and rules. Meets two periods per week.
Fundamental skills of shooting, passing, ball-handling, person-to-person defensive play, offensive strategy, basic rules, team play, and injury prevention. Meets two periods per week.
Instruction in the basic skills of serving, setting, passing, and spiking, and the basic instruction of rules, and 2-, 3-, 4-, and 6-person team play. Meets two periods.
Learning the fundamental skills of ball control, passing, blocking, and shooting goals. Meets two periods per week.

PHILOSOPHY AND ETHICS
An introduction to basic philosophical issues, including the relationship of faith and reason, epistemology, the mind-body problem, determinism and free will, and ethics.
A consideration of a range of moral theories and principles providing the basis for the thoughtful consideration of specific ethical issues within the biblical tradition.
A foundation course in moral being, decision-making, and action. Explores timeless biblical norms alongside a range of moral theories and principles providing the basis for thoughtful consideration of specific moral issues toward making basic ethical decisions across the personal, social, and professional spectrum.

PHYSICS
A survey of basic physics including astronomy, matter, physical laws, electricity, magnetism, optics and atomic and nuclear science.
This course covers the basic concepts of physics using non-calculus based mathematics and trigonometry. Topics covered include kinematics, dynamics, gravity, work, energy, momentum, angular momentum, conservation laws, thermodynamics, fluids, vibrations, and waves. This class requires competency in calculus.
Prerequisites: PHYS301.
This is the second semester of physics which is a continuation and builds on semester I concepts. Topics covered include: practical problem solving skills, electrostatics, magnetism, circuits, optics, relativity, atomic structure, the nucleus, and fundamental particles.

PSYCHOLOGY
Principles of psychology including the study of growth, perception, learning, thinking, motivation, emotion, personality, and mental health. Students will understand themselves and others, and thereby be better prepared to deal with the issues of life and living.
Lifespan is an integrative approach to psychological development which emphasizes the interdependency of physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development. The interrelatedness of theory, research, and application are seen throughout the entire sequence of human development from conception to death.
Prerequisite: Senior Standing An introduction to the theory, concepts, aims, and process of school counseling and guidance, consultation, and current trends in legal and ethical matters. Roles, functions, and identity of school counselors.

RELIGIOUS STUDIES
The mission, the message, and the meaning of Jesus Christ for His day and for ours. Why the Christian story captured the attention of many? The connection between Christ's first Advent and His second.
A survey of the content and message of the Old Testament books. The application of Old Testament truths to contemporary living.
A survey of the history, literature, and message of the New Testament's book of Acts of the Apostles and the Epistles. The story of the development of the Christian Church in the first century A.D.
A study of the four gospels as historical and theological documents and as sources of information on the life and teaching of Jesus.
A study of the biblical perspective on the transforming work of the Holy Spirit, the devotional principles that guide the spiritual life, and the means of grace that foster growth in Christ.
An introductory course in Biblical Hebrew grammar providing students with tools for elementary word studies, engagement with the biblical text in reading, exegesis, and theology. Vocabulary, parts of speech, tenses, and simple sentence patterns.
Prerequisites: RLGN252.
The development of Biblical Hebrew vocabulary together with grammatical and reading skills. Worldview, syntax, exegesis, interpretation and theology of major texts.
An introductory course in NT Greek grammar providing students with tools for elementary word studies, engagement with the biblical text in reading, exegesis, and theology. Vocabulary, parts of speech, tenses, and simple sentence patterns.
Prerequisites: RLGN255.
The development of NT Greek vocabulary together with grammatical skills for deeper engagement with the biblical text. Worldview, syntax, exegesis, interpretation, and theology of major texts.
Prerequisites: RLGN256.
Advanced NT Greek study including selected portions from Luke, Paul, the book of Hebrews, and James, analyzed on the bases of Greek syntax and author specific vocabulary. Selections from the Septuagint and early church fathers will be considered to illustrate the development of thought within Christianity as well as sections from Philo and Josephus for further perspective.
The dynamics of personal Christian ministry in the neighborhood, at work, in small groups, and in the person-to-person approach of Bible studies. A study of the biblical perspective on the priesthood of all believers and the mobilization of spiritual gifts. Christīs example of witnessing is highlighted.
An introduction to the biblical theology of worship, music, and liturgy. A survey of the development of music in the church, techniques in enhancing congregational singing, different types of church service music, representative hymnology, music from a contemporary context, and engaging musicians for worship leadership and nurture.
This course explores how God confronts human beings?including the process of revelation, principles of interpreting Scripture, the nature of God and His expectations for humans, biblical themes relating to human life in response to God, and the evaluation of these concepts as presented in Scripture.
Basic principles for understanding biblical interpretation in an Adventist context?definition, history, interpretive methods and approaches, the NT use of the OT, biblical genre (narrative, prophecy, poetry, wisdom, epistle), cultural aspects of the Bible, when the Bible does not address modern questions, and the theological use of the Bible.
An introductory study surveying the major religious traditions of the world: Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Shintoism, Judaism, Islam, Animism, and Christianity. Consideration is given to their origins, historical setting, their founders, worldviews, culture, their view of God and man, their moral values and ethics, and their major philosophical and theological teachings.
An introductory study surveying the major religious traditions of the world: Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Shintoism, Judaism, Islam, Animism, and Christianity. Consideration is given to their origins, historical setting, their founders, worldviews, culture, their view of God and man, their moral values and ethics, and their major philosophical and theological teachings.
Prerequisites: .
Corequisite: ENGL212 A step-by-step study and application of basic research techniques and design used in religious studies. Students will produce a research paper on a topic in religion and defend their research product in an oral examination.
Required short- and long-term field projects for practicing, strengthening, and refining pastoral knowledge and skills in an authentic context while studying BA in Theology degree program at the University. Are in addition to the practical aspects of other ministerial courses such as Personal Ministry, Pastoral Ministry, Pastoral Counseling, Biblical Preaching I &, and Church Planting. Fall Semester registration of the student's sophomore, junior, and senior year RLGN295, 395, or 495 respectively with course requirements completed during the Fall and Spring semesters of given year?a total of 30 sessions (15 sessions per semester). Periodic reporting and growth portfolio completed in the Spring. An ?S? or ?U? designation (satisfactory or unsatisfactory) will be given for each semester. Students cannot graduate before completing the praxis course series.
The background, content, and construction of the OT apocalyptic book of Daniel. An exegetical study with emphasis upon the interpretation of prophecy, apocalyptic imagery, and symbols.
The background, content, and construction of NT apocalyptic book of Revelation. An exegetical study with emphasis upon the interpretation of prophecy, apocalyptic imagery, and symbols.
An introduction to the Pentateuch: selected passages, dominant themes, relevant historical and social backgrounds, and theological motifs in relation to Hebrew Scripture and NT backgrounds.
An introduction to the biblical major and minor prophets of Israel and prophetic literature (history of prophecy, pre-writing prophetic figures, books of the writing prophets to the end of the prophetic OT canon). Attention is given to literary analysis, theology and ethics of the books, and the relevance of their message to present-day issues.
An introduction to the OT historical books, Psalms, and wisdom literature. Selected passages and themes are studied highlighting relevant historical and social backgrounds, theological motifs, ethics and relevance to present-day issues.
Studies in the background, message, and interpretation of the Book of Acts and the Epistles of the NT, with emphasis on Luke/Acts theology and Paulīs letters to the Roman and the Corinthian churches.
Studies in the background, message, and interpretation of the NT epistles, with emphasis on Paulīs letters and the General Epistles.
This course surveys the internal and external developments and conflicts that Christianity has experienced from the time of Christ up to the Reformation. Special attention is given to those developments that relate to the Seventh-day Adventist theological heritage. It aims to enable students to develop a broader historical perspective through which the outworking of the Great Controversy is seen.
This course surveys the history of the church from the Protestant Reformation to the present. Attention is given to the Protestant Reformation, the Catholic Counter-Reformation, Puritanism, Rationalism, Evangelicalism, modern denominations, the worldwide mission expansion, and ecumenism.
A study of the historical context within which Seventh-day Adventist originated, significant points in its development, the prophetic office of Ellen G. White, and challenges facing the contemporary church.
The pastor as leader of worship, nurturer, church administrator, and evangelist. Adequate local church organization and administration, combining pastoral leadership with church management. The four-dimensional role of the pastorperson, administrator, church leader and priest. Principles of worship, pastoral duties, and ethics.
Prerequisites: .
A study of the art of preaching. The foundation for biblical sermon construction and delivery. This course addresses the crucial nature of expository preaching, stressing proper principles of interpreting and applying the text to practical life. Supervised classroom and church preaching.
The definition and clarification of the fundamental doctrines of Seventh-day Adventism. Students will understand the uniqueness of Adventism and its relevance and role as an end-time movement.
A study of the prophetic manifestation in the Bible, the Church, and history: canonical and non-canonical prophets, worldview and cosmic conflict, ethics, nurture, divine character and mission, and prophecy of the future. The historical role, ministry, and writings of Ellen G. White and her influence on Adventism.
An introduction to and historical development of Islamic religious thought. Islamic/Muslim worldview(s), theology, culture and society, institutions, creeds, ethics, Muhammad's prophetic journey, and major qur'anic themes are surveyed in relation to the distinctives of the Adventist faith and communicating Adventist beliefs in Muslim context.
Required short- and long-term field projects for practicing, strengthening, and refining pastoral knowledge and skills in an authentic context while studying BA in Theology degree program at the University. Are in addition to the practical aspects of other ministerial courses such as Personal Ministry, Pastoral Ministry, Pastoral Counseling, Biblical Preaching I &, and Church Planting. Fall Semester registration of the student's sophomore, junior, and senior year RLGN295, 395, or 495 respectively with course requirements completed during the Fall and Spring semesters of given year?a total of 30 sessions (15 sessions per semester). Periodic reporting and growth portfolio completed in the Spring. An ?S? or ?U? designation (satisfactory or unsatisfactory) will be given for each semester. Students cannot graduate before completing the praxis course series.
A consideration of the various contexts in which the biblical documents were written and how these texts have been interpreted.
This course opens up new avenues to and background for the interpretation of the Bible. It develops an appreciation for the indebtedness of great art, music, and literature to biblical themes and types, and awakens a new awareness of the ?beauty of holiness? as expressed through the literary forms of the Bible.
An exegetical/expositional introduction to the Book of Hebrews?text, historical context, and style and structure towards understanding the book's worldview, theology, ethics and eschatology (including Christology, sanctuary motif, atonement, as well as Christian identity and hope, suffering, and perseverance).
An introductory study of the archaeological and historical evidence relating to the Old and New Testament. The role of archaeology in biblical study. Field trips are required.
The understanding that pastoring is by definition counseling. Introduces both the actual skill of counseling and the acquisition of knowledge and insights based on reading and experience. The basic principles of pastoral counseling and ethics, pre-marital counseling, and practical counseling.
Prerequisites: RLGN366.
This course explores further methods of expository preaching such as narrative, induction, and great themes of the Scriptures. It addresses the needs of special preaching events such as public evangelistic campaigns and their techniques, weddings, funerals, dedications, supervised classroom and church preaching.
Prerequisites: .
Corequisite: RLGN375 An introduction to Systematic Theology. The course studies the basic Christian doctrines of God, revelation and inspiration. The Bible, the Trinity, creation, evil, angels, man, and nature of sin. These doctrines are examined in regard to their biblical foundations, historical expressions, and practical and social implications.
Prerequisites: RLGN471.
A study of Christian doctrines of Jesus Christ, atonement, the Holy Spirit, salvation, the Church, and eschatology. These doctrines are examined in regard to their biblical foundations, historical expressions, and practical and social implications.
A survey of status and role of Christianity and mission worldwide. A brief history of Christian mission, current facts about mission needs, mission as a basic function of the church, Christian and mission relationships to world religions, political ideologies, national development, and cultures in relation to Adventist worldview and missional distinctives. The application of biblical theology in defining the concerns, priorities, structures, and methods of mission in the light of biblical eschatology and cosmic conflict motif.
The biblical rationale, theological and missional importance of church planting. Basic models and procedures for successful church planting programs and ways of implementing. Principles of gospel planting movement focus and strategy toward establishing spiritually healthy and biblically grounded selfreproducing worshipping groups (home groups) of Seventh-day Adventist believers in major cities and unreached regions, which sensitively interacts with the faith journey of those in the region serving them in a holistic way.
Prerequisite: Senior Standing and approval of the department chairperson. An independent research in religious studies. A research paper of 15 pages per credit is required. The student will also defend the paper's findings in an oral examination.
Required short- and long-term field projects for practicing, strengthening, and refining pastoral knowledge and skills in an authentic context while studying BA in Theology degree program at the University. Are in addition to the practical aspects of other ministerial courses such as Personal Ministry, Pastoral Ministry, Pastoral Counseling, Biblical Preaching I &, and Church Planting. Fall Semester registration of the student's sophomore, junior, and senior year RLGN295, 395, or 495 respectively with course requirements completed during the Fall and Spring semesters of given year?a total of 30 sessions (15 sessions per semester). Periodic reporting and growth portfolio completed in the Spring. An ?S? or ?U? designation (satisfactory or unsatisfactory) will be given for each semester. Students cannot graduate before completing the praxis course series.

SOCIOLOGY
Provides a theoretical and practical basis for understanding and meeting needs of communities and individuals. Course materials include works from Christian and secular sources. Students develop an individualized practical plan to understand and meet needs. Does not apply to a major or minor.
A survey of the development of sociology as a social science, its principles, terms, and concepts. The course focuses on the behavior patterns of different groups of society and their effects on social interaction and change. It includes the study of norms, values, processes, socialization, and culture.